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School Programs

Would you like your next field trip to
  • Be easy to coordinate and implement?
  • Be an imaginative experience that make history vibrant and alive?
  • Complement your curriculum?
  • Encourage pride and interest in our local community?
  • Generate classroom discussion?

Then we invite you to bring your students to our annual school programs listed below:

The Civil War Program

May 9-12, 2017

9:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

school_civilCivil War reenactors interact with students to give them insights and perspectives of Civil War soldiers’ lives. A presentation provides background information. The program is design for grades 3 and up. This program contains images of wartime violence and may not be suitable for all audiences.

Indiana Academic Standards (Social Studies) for the Civil War Program

Third Grade

3.1.8 Describe how your community has changed over time and how it has stayed the same.

3.4.8 Gather data from a variety of resources about changes that have had an economic impact on your community.

Fourth Grade

4.1.7 Explain the roles of various individuals, groups, and movements in the social conflicts leading to the Civil War.

4.1.8 Summarize the impact of Abraham Lincoln’s presidency on Indiana and describe the participation of Indiana citizens in the Civil War.

Sixth Grade

6.1.23 Identify issues related to an historical event in Europe or the Americas and give basic arguments for and against that issue utilizing the perspectives, interests and values of those involved.

6.2.5 Discuss the impact of major forms of government in Europe and the Americas on civil and human rights.

Eighth Grade

8.1.11 Compare and contrast the ways of life in the northern and southern states, including the growth of towns and cities and the growth of industry in the North and the growing dependence on slavery and the production of cotton in the South.

8.1.20 Give examples of how immigration affected American culture in the decades before and the Civil War, including growth of industrial sites in the North; religious differences; tensions between middle-class and working-class people, particularly in the Northeast; and intensification of cultural differences between the North and the South.

8.1.21 Give examples of the changing role of women, minorities, and immigrants in the northern, southern and western parts of the United States in the mid-nineteenth century, and examine possible causes for
these changes.

8.1.22 Describe the abolitionist movement and identify figures and organizations involved in the debate over slavery, including leaders of the Underground Railroad

8.1.23 Analyze the influence of early individual social reformers and movements such as the abolitionist, feminist and social reform movements.

8.1.24 Analyze the causes and effects of events leading to the Civil War, and evaluate the impact issues such as states’ rights and slavery had in developing America’s sectional conflict.

8.1.25 Identify the factors and individuals which influenced the outcome of the Civil War and explain the significance of each.

8.1.26 Compare and contrast the three plans for Reconstruction and evaluate the merits of each.

8.1.27 Describe causes and lasting effects of the Civil War and Reconstruction as well as the political controversies surrounding this time such as Andrew Johnson’s impeachment, the Black Codes, and the Compromise of 1877. (Government, Economics)

8.2.1 Identify and explain essential ideas of constitutional government, which include limited government; rule of law; due process of law; separated and shared powers; checks and balances; federalism; popular sovereignty; republicanism; representative government; and individual rights to life, liberty and property; and freedom of conscience.

Cabin Days

2017 TBA

319During Cabin Days, volunteers dressed as pioneers demonstrate trades and recreation common in the 1830s. Lively interaction often occurs as students, eager to learn about life “back then,” ask questions of the “pioneers” they visit. A blacksmith forges tools that were used in pioneer days and a woodsman shows how logs were cut. Students sit in rows as the “school marm” teaches lessons and a “doctor” speaks of the uses of leeches in treating fevers and other maladies. Students can walk through the Navarre Cabin to see the interior of the home built by Pierre Navarre, the first European to settle permanently in the area. In 2006, the Navarre Cabin underwent an extensive renovation, which included repair and replacement of original logs and reconstruction of windows. The program is designed for grades 3 and up.

Indiana Academic Standards (Social Studies) for the Cabin Days Program

Third Grade

3.1.1 Identify and describe Native American Woodland Indians who lived in the region when European settlers arrived.

3.1.2 Explain why and how the local community was established and identify its founders and early settlers.

3.1.3 Describe the role of the local community and other communities in the development of the state’s regions.

3.1.4 Give examples of people, events and developments that brought important changes to your community and the region where your community is located.

3.1.8 Describe how your community has changed over time and how it has stayed the same.

3.3.11 Describe how Native Americans and early settlers of Indiana adapted to and modified their environment to
survive.

3.4.3 Give examples of trade in the local community and explain how trade benefits both parties.

3.4.4 Define interdependence and give examples of how people in the local community depend on each other for goods and services.

Fourth Grade

4.1.2 Identify and describe historic Native American Indian groups that lived in Indiana at the time of early European exploration, including ways these groups adapted to and interacted with the physical environment.

4.1.5 Identify and explain the causes of the removal of Native American Indian groups in the state and their resettlement during the 1830s

4.3.6 Describe Indiana’s landforms (lithosphere*), water features (hydrosphere*), and plants and animals (biosphere*).

4.3.8 Identify the challenges in the physical landscape of Indiana to early settlers and modern day economic development.

4.3.9 Explain the importance of major transportation routes, including rivers, in the exploration, settlement and growth of Indiana and in the state’s location as a crossroad of America.

Fifth Grade

5.1.2 Examine accounts of early European explorations of North America including major land and water routes, reasons for exploration and the impact the exploration had.

5.1.3 Compare and contrast historic Indian groups of the West, Southwest, Northwest, Arctic and sub-Arctic, Great Plains, and Eastern Woodlands regions at the beginning of European exploration in the late fifteenth and sixteenth centuries.

5.1.6 Identify and explain instances of both cooperation and conflict that existed between Native American Indians and colonists

5.3.7 Identify major sources of accessible fresh water and describe the impact of access on the local and regional communities.

5.3.11 Describe adaptation and how Native American Indians and colonists adapted to variations in the physical environment.

5.4.1 Describe the economic activities within and among Native American Indian cultures prior to contact with Europeans. Examine the economic incentives that helped motivate European exploration and colonization.

Sixth Grade

6.1.20 Analyze cause-and-effect relationships, keeping in mind multiple causations, including the importance of individuals, ideas, human interests, beliefs and chance in history.

6.3.10 Explain the ways cultural diffusion, invention, and innovation change culture.

6.3.13 Explain the impact of humans on the physical environment in Europe and the Americas.

6.4.2 Analyze how countries of Europe and the Americas have been influenced by trade in different historical periods.

The Fur Trade Program

THIS PROGRAM IS RETURNING IN THE SPRING OF 2018!

9:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.(approx)

 

pioneer-hunter-trapper-with-rifle_GkYCoDUuStudents gain insight into the importance of the fur trade in northern Indiana during the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries. They examine silver shaped into crosses and animal forms to learn how European explorers bartered with Native Americans for goods. A view of axes, guns, traps and such household items as a bone needle used in making clothing teaches the self-sufficiency of the fur traders. Following a audio/visual presentation, classes board their buses to travel to Riverview Cemetery, the site of the 1679 landing of French explorer LaSalle. From that point, students walk the portage used by LaSalle and countless numbers of Native Americans, explorers, voyageurs and fur traders as they journeyed through this area.

Indiana Academic Standards (Social Studies) for the Fur Trade Program

Third Grade

3.1.1 Identify and describe Native American Woodland Indians who lived in the region when European settlers arrived.

3.1.2 Explain why and how the local community was established and identify its founders and early settlers.

3.1.3 Describe the role of the local community and other communities in the development of the state’s regions.

3.1.4 Give examples of people, events and developments that brought important changes to your community and the region where your community is located.

3.1.8 Describe how your community has changed over time and how it has stayed the same.

3.3.2 Label a map of the Midwest, identifying states, major rivers, lakes and the Great Lakes.

3.3.3 Locate Indiana and other Midwestern states on maps using simple grid systems.

3.3.11 Describe how Native Americans and early settlers of Indiana adapted to and modified their environment to
survive.

3.4.3 Give examples of trade in the local community and explain how trade benefits both parties.

3.4.4 Define interdependence and give examples of how people in the local community depend on each other for goods
and services.

Fourth Grade

4.1.2 Identify and describe historic Native American Indian groups that lived in Indiana at the time of early European exploration, including ways these groups adapted to and interacted with the physical environment.

4.1.5 Identify and explain the causes of the removal of Native American Indian groups in the state and their resettlement during the 1830s

4.3.6 Describe Indiana’s landforms (lithosphere*), water features (hydrosphere*), and plants and animals (biosphere*).

4.3.8 Identify the challenges in the physical landscape of Indiana to early settlers and modern day economic development.

4.3.9 Explain the importance of major transportation routes, including rivers, in the exploration, settlement and growth of Indiana and in the state’s location as a crossroad of America.

4.3.10 Identify immigration patterns and describe the impact diverse ethnic and cultural groups has had and has on Indiana.

Fifth Grade

5.1.2 Examine accounts of early European explorations of North America including major land and water routes, reasons for exploration and the impact the exploration had.

5.1.3 Compare and contrast historic Indian groups of the West, Southwest, Northwest, Arctic and sub-Arctic, Great Plains, and Eastern Woodlands regions at the beginning of European exploration in the late fifteenth and sixteenth centuries.

5.1.4 Locate and compare the origins, physical structure and social structure of early Spanish, French and British settlements.

5.1.6 Identify and explain instances of both cooperation and conflict that existed between Native American Indians and colonists

5.3.4 Identify Native American Indian and colonial settlements on maps and explain the reasons for the locations of these places.

5.3.7 Identify major sources of accessible fresh water and describe the impact of access on the local and regional communities.

5.3.11 Describe adaptation and how Native American Indians and colonists adapted to variations in the physical environment.

5.4.1 Describe the economic activities within and among Native American Indian cultures prior to contact with Europeans. Examine the economic incentives that helped motivate European exploration and colonization.

Sixth Grade

6.1.20 Analyze cause-and-effect relationships, keeping in mind multiple causations, including the importance of individuals, ideas, human interests, beliefs and chance in history.

6.3.10 Explain the ways cultural diffusion, invention, and innovation change culture.

6.3.13 Explain the impact of humans on the physical environment in Europe and the Americas.

6.4.2 Analyze how countries of Europe and the Americas have been influenced by trade in different historical periods.

To make a reservation for your class...

contact our Tour Coordinator at 574-235-9664, ext. 239 or
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